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Is it normal for dogs to eat cicadas?

6 Comments

  1. Goldengal says:

    Had another person from Illinois ask this same question this morning. Her dog is eating them also. From what everyone said it’s OK. Pure protein.

  2. jeffrok says:

    Bugs usually don’t make dogs sick, or at least the dogs I’ve had.. Unless it’s some venomous bug (cicadas aren’t), I wouldn’t worry about it. I think bugs are mostly just protein.

  3. dances_with_unicorns1955 says:

    It’s fine; lots of animals eat them, and it won’t hurt your dog at all.

  4. iluvmurphie says:

    Hi! Im not really familiar with cicadas (we don’t have them in our area) but here’s stuff I found online with links beneath them so you can read more if you want to. Hope this helps!

    THE LONG ANSWER:

    "Arlington, Va.: Can one overdose on cicadas, specifically can a dog? I have been warned that dogs love to eat these things and I am wondering how hard to try to stop them.

    David George Gordon: Overdose? Not that I know of. However, you CAN overdose on honeybee larvae One study confirmed that these critters may contain 15 times the recommended daily allowance of vitamins A and D!

    Taken over an extended period, 2 1/2 tablespoons of honeybee larvae can induce symptoms of vitamin D toxicity — which can include hardening of the soft tissues of the heart. "

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&node=&contentId=A16056-2004Apr15&notFound=true

    "Bethesda, Md.: I have seen several contradictory write ups on Cicadas and their threat to pets. I have heard that they are filled with protein and won’t hurt your animal if they were to eat one, but I have also heard that they can be harmful and to try your best to prevent your pet from eating them. Which theory is correct?

    Ed Lewis: My friends around Blacksburg, where the emergence occurred last year, told me of their dogs "eating them like popcorn". As far as I know, all dogs have remained healthy and happy. No toxicity has been reported in the scientific literature either. "

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A20434-2004May12.html

    "FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!
    "Crunch, crunch …" Yuck! Cicada Season?
    I’ve had my share of pulling crunchy bugs out of the mouths of puppies, and tried to stop my dogs from eating beetles before, but never on a grand scale. This press release from the HSUS has me thanking my lucky stars that it’s only a tent caterpillar invasion I have to contend with this year, and maybe not even that. Phew!

    Press Release:
    During Cicada Season, Watch Out For Pets’ Overindulgence Says The Humane Society Of The United States

    WASHINGTON (April 27, 2004) -The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) cautions pet owners about potential digestion problems for pets who eat too many of the cicadas that will be infesting the atmosphere along the Eastern United States this spring and early summer.

    The large-scale emergence of the Brood X cicadas is expected to start in early May and could last a month or more, according reports from entomologists. Randall Lockwood, animal behaviorist and a vice president for The HSUS, says the large, slow moving cicadas are a tasty treat to dogs, cats and other predators. While the insects can provide protein, the exoskeletons of mature cicadas are indigestible. "Pets who gorge on cicadas may find themselves vomiting or constipated," Lockwood said.

    However, the bugs are generally harmless to animals. They do not carry toxins, nor do they bite or sting. If a pet catches a few of these insects, it is usually not cause for alarm. But an overindulgent pet who eats many cicadas and has more than one or two episodes of vomiting, or appears to be in pain, may need to see a veterinarian. The HSUS has the following tips for pet owners during cicada season:

    Don’t leave pets unsupervised outdoors.
    Since many cicadas will be clinging to window screens, be sure screens are secured or windows are closed to prevent pets from pushing out screens in pursuit of the creatures.
    When walking your dog, maintain a good grip on the leash and be prepared for sudden attempts to grab the flying bugs.
    Cats should always be kept indoors for their safety.
    Call your veterinarian should your pet exhibit signs of illness including multiple episodes of vomiting or constipation.

    These simple precautions can help animal lovers and their companions appreciate this amazing natural event that generally comes only once in the average dog or cat’s lifetime.

    The HSUS is the nation’s largest animal protection organization with over eight million members and constituents. The HSUS is a mainstream voice for animals, with active programs in companion animals and equine protection, wildlife and habitat protection, animals in research and farm animals and sustainable agriculture. The HSUS protects all animals through legislation, litigation, investigation, education, advocacy and fieldwork. The non-profit organization, which celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2004, is based in Washington, DC and has 10 regional offices across the country. Visit us on the Web at http://www.hsus.org."

    the SHORT(er) ANSWER

    "Pets who gorge on cicadas may find themselves vomiting or constipated," Lockwood said.

    However, the bugs are generally harmless to animals. They do not carry toxins, nor do they bite or sting. If a pet catches a few of these insects, it is usually not cause for alarm. But an overindulgent pet who eats many cicadas and has more than one or two episodes of vomiting, or appears to be in pain, may need to see a veterinarian. The HSUS has the following tips for pet owners during cicada season:

    Don’t leave pets unsupervised outdoors.
    Since many cicadas will be clinging to window screens, be sure screens are secured or windows are closed to prevent pets from pushing out screens in pursuit of the creatures.
    When walking your dog, maintain a good grip on the leash and be prepared for sudden attempts to grab the flying bugs.
    Cats should always be kept indoors for their safety.
    Call your veterinarian should your pet exhibit signs of illness including multiple episodes of vomiting or constipation.

  5. Katie says:

    "Arlington, Va.: Can one overdose on cicadas, specifically can a dog? I have been warned that dogs love to eat these things and I am wondering how hard to try to stop them.

    David George Gordon: Overdose? Not that I know of. However, you CAN overdose on honeybee larvae One study confirmed that these critters may contain 15 times the recommended daily allowance of vitamins A and D!

    Taken over an extended period, 2 1/2 tablespoons of honeybee larvae can induce symptoms of vitamin D toxicity — which can include hardening of the soft tissues of the heart. "

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn...

    "Bethesda, Md.: I have seen several contradictory write ups on Cicadas and their threat to pets. I have heard that they are filled with protein and won’t hurt your animal if they were to eat one, but I have also heard that they can be harmful and to try your best to prevent your pet from eating them. Which theory is correct?

    Ed Lewis: My friends around Blacksburg, where the emergence occurred last year, told me of their dogs "eating them like popcorn". As far as I know, all dogs have remained healthy and happy. No toxicity has been reported in the scientific literature either. "

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/art...

    "FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!
    "Crunch, crunch …" Yuck! Cicada Season?
    I’ve had my share of pulling crunchy bugs out of the mouths of puppies, and tried to stop my dogs from eating beetles before, but never on a grand scale. This press release from the HSUS has me thanking my lucky stars that it’s only a tent caterpillar invasion I have to contend with this year, and maybe not even that. Phew!

    Press Release:
    During Cicada Season, Watch Out For Pets’ Overindulgence Says The Humane Society Of The United States

    WASHINGTON (April 27, 2004) -The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) cautions pet owners about potential digestion problems for pets who eat too many of the cicadas that will be infesting the atmosphere along the Eastern United States this spring and early summer.

    The large-scale emergence of the Brood X cicadas is expected to start in early May and could last a month or more, according reports from entomologists. Randall Lockwood, animal behaviorist and a vice president for The HSUS, says the large, slow moving cicadas are a tasty treat to dogs, cats and other predators. While the insects can provide protein, the exoskeletons of mature cicadas are indigestible. "Pets who gorge on cicadas may find themselves vomiting or constipated," Lockwood said.

    However, the bugs are generally harmless to animals. They do not carry toxins, nor do they bite or sting. If a pet catches a few of these insects, it is usually not cause for alarm. But an overindulgent pet who eats many cicadas and has more than one or two episodes of vomiting, or appears to be in pain, may need to see a veterinarian. The HSUS has the following tips for pet owners during cicada season:

    Don’t leave pets unsupervised outdoors.
    Since many cicadas will be clinging to window screens, be sure screens are secured or windows are closed to prevent pets from pushing out screens in pursuit of the creatures.
    When walking your dog, maintain a good grip on the leash and be prepared for sudden attempts to grab the flying bugs.
    Cats should always be kept indoors for their safety.
    Call your veterinarian should your pet exhibit signs of illness including multiple episodes of vomiting or constipation.

    These simple precautions can help animal lovers and their companions appreciate this amazing natural event that generally comes only once in the average dog or cat’s lifetime.

    The HSUS is the nation’s largest animal protection organization with over eight million members and constituents. The HSUS is a mainstream voice for animals, with active programs in companion animals and equine protection, wildlife and habitat protection, animals in research and farm animals and sustainable agriculture. The HSUS protects all animals through legislation, litigation, investigation, education, advocacy and fieldwork. The non-profit organization, which celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2004, is based in Washington, DC and has 10 regional offices across the country. Visit us on the Web at http://www.hsus.org."

    the SHORT(er) ANSWER

    "Pets who gorge on cicadas may find themselves vomiting or constipated," Lockwood said.

    However, the bugs are generally harmless to animals. They do not carry toxins, nor do they bite or sting. If a pet catches a few of these insects, it is usually not cause for alarm. But an overindulgent pet who eats many cicadas and has more than one or two episodes of vomiting, or appears to be in pain, may need to see a veterinarian. The HSUS has the following tips for pet owners during cicada season:

    Don’t leave pets unsupervised outdoors.
    Since many cicadas will be clinging to window screens, be sure screens are secured or windows are closed to prevent pets from pushing out screens in pursuit of the creatures.
    When walking your dog, maintain a good grip on the leash and be prepared for sudden attempts to grab the flying bugs.
    Cats should always be kept indoors for their safety.
    Call your veterinarian should your pet exhibit signs of illness including multiple episodes of vomiting or constipation

    Pure Protein

  6. Erin says:

    Cicadas can make your dog sick. Our Australian Shepherd was just treated last week for an intestinal blockage caused by eating too many cicada exoskeletons. The signs were vomiting and diarrhea and lethargy. She lost 9lbs in 2.5 days.

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